Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War

Police Ordered to Stay at Stations in Monterrey

Monday, January 10, 2011 |

Two police departments in Monterrey, the capital of the northern Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, have ordered officers to stay at their stations in the wake of attacks that left four law enforcement agents dead and three others wounded, officials said.

Monterrey transit police commanders and officials in the suburb of Guadalupe ordered officers in their departments to not go on patrol.

Police in the neighboring cities of San Nicolas, Apodaca and San Pedro are continuing to patrol the streets, but they are doing so in convoys, spokesmen for the different departments said.

Two transit police officers were murdered and two others wounded Friday night in Monterrey.



The city, home to some of Mexico’s largest industrial corporations, plans to request the deployment of more Federal Police officers, Mayor Fernando Larrazabal said Saturday.

Transit police do not have adequate weapons to take on the gunmen employed by the drug cartels that operate in the area, Larrazabal said.

Two officers in Apodaca, a city in the Monterrey metropolitan area, were murdered last week by gunmen armed with assault rifles.

More than half a dozen attacks have been staged since the beginning of the year on police departments in the area.

The attacks were blamed on drug traffickers who claim the slain officers worked for Los Zetas, considered Mexico’s most violent cartel.

Gunmen fired shots and hurled grenades at a prison in Monterrey last week.




The attack occurred around 7:30 a.m. Thursday at the Topo Chico prison in northwest Monterrey, where residents reported hearing gunfire and an explosion, police spokesmen said.

Shots hit the prison’s walls and a nearby guard post, while a grenade damaged several vehicles parked outside the facility.

Police found dozens of bullet casings from assault rifles outside the prison and a grenade that did not go off on a side street.

Another grenade exploded on Cuautla street, shattering the windows of nearby houses and parked cars.

Nuevo Leon was rocked by a wave of drug-related violence last year that left 517 people dead, including 30 innocent victims and more than 70 municipal police officers, federal officers and soldiers.

Share it:

24 Borderland Beat Comments:

''lito'brito said...

well thats nice ...so much for even a little police protection...

so i guess there is no debate about it ...the narcos have won and now Mexico is near to being the "failed state"

when the police are afraid to patrol...it is over

Layla2 said...

I agree! They'd better get Federal Police in there quick and get these patrols going. Whatever happened to fed snipers on the rooftops here and there looking out for these scumbags that do the killing?

What military tactical deployment is not being tried here? Suburb or Monterrey or Monterrey proper, it's time to keep a 24/7 watch patrol and start picking these people off when they come out. You know they know who they are...they have a certain look (or are holding a rifle!)

Retreat is NOT the answer! Go to the villages and round up hard working poor people, who would perhaps otherwise become migrants to the US, and offer them a JOB! Train them to become fed police and pay them well. Take all your narco money and put it into law enforcement...

If no protection...it will all be over in one way or another.

Ovemex said...

The only ones that were pulled (and this was only in Mty and Guadalupe) were transit police. These police do not even carry weapons..

On another note two more police in San Nicolas de los Garza were just killed a few hours ago, one other has been injured.

http://www.milenio.com/node/618494

Mty Mayor Fernando Larrazabal has requested that Mty be militarized.

http://www.milenio.com/node/618361

AND the bodyguard of the Nuevo Leon State Security spokesman, Jorge Domene Zambrano, has been shot in San Pedro...more info coming. at this time police are saying it has nothing to do with the security spokesman, but rather than a simple attempted auto theft gone bad.

"lito "brito said...

there are already federal policia all over the place here ...but..they don't do any foot patrols ..or have any neighbor hood presence...same with the army...you see four ,five ,six truckloads at a time ...going somewhere...all the time......the federals are back at the plaza del arco on madero...complete with a big ol scary lookin armoured truck thing...but they just sort of hang out ...it seems like they would be on every other street corner and walking a beat ..but no....and they drive around with their blue lights flashing all the time ...just to warn the criminals to get scarce before they get there? ?...there are municipal cops ...feds ..soldados all over the place , but it makes no difference... i give up...it all makes no sense ...

Capo said...

Who exactly is the "New Federacion" made up of? I know the original "Federacion" were made up of cartel members from the Golden Triangle: Durango, Sinaloa, and Chihuahua.

Matanzas said...

'brito, it can only work if they quit messing around and if
1-the city is under martial law and a curfew is enacted
2-civil courts are replaced by military tribunals with suspension of civil law
3-military officers are supervising the civil administration
4-all unsure police units are disarmed and quarantined
But it will not happen with Calderon. He would shit his pants.
Take care of yourself buddy.

Anonymous said...

Mexico is not anywhere near to being a 'failed state'. To suggest such a thing merely plays on the ignorance of Americans about all things Latin America. Haiti is a failed state. Mexico is not.

Failed states are almost always produced by those states that want other countries/ societies to fail, or the unintended consequences of the manipulations of more powerful countries. Failed state almost always have no real national economy of any sort. Mexico does, and I'm not just talking about the trade in illicit goods. The Mexican economy may be a sick economy, but then so is the one in the US, which is an economy that the Mexican economy is most intimately tied to.

Ernest1

J said...

New Federacion is Sinaloa, La Familia, and Cartel De Golfo. These new messages aren't from a new group, just the same one from early last year, re establishing their presence and alliance.

Guero said...

@Ernest1

" A failed state is one in which the central government has lost control over significant areas of the country and the state is unable to function. In revisiting this issue, it seems to us that the Mexican government has lost control of the northern tier of Mexico to drug-smuggling organizations, which have significantly greater power in that region than government forces. Moreover, the ability of the central government to assert its will against these organizations has weakened to the point that decisions made by the state against the cartels are not being implemented or are being implemented in a way that would guarantee failure." STRATFOR

Consider Mexico's top 3 sources of income Tourism, down due to the drug war, PEMEX, being plundered by the cartels hijacking trucks and tapping into pipelines as well as kidnapping or corrupting their employees. And lastly banking or to be blunt Mexicans working in the US and sending money home to Mexico, with the downturn in the economy this has dropped significantly. Then of course we have money laundering. Not the picture of a stable country amigo, no matter how you spin it.

Buela said...

Get the ice skates out kiddos..because hell is def frozen over...because..

I agree with E1, in the true sense Mexico is not yet a failed state...however is however definately in a state of disintegration. The perfect storm is brewing..

US joint forces command recommended that Messico be monitored along with Pakistan as a WEAK and FAILING STATE that potentially could crumble swiftly..

I encourage anyone that is interested in this subject to read MEXICO NARCO-VIOLENCE AND A FAILED STATE?
By Geroge Grayson...

Grayson is a scholar, and is ranked as one of the most knowledgeable analysts of Messico society and politics.

Anonymous said...

@ Guero

Oil exports and remittances are # 1 and 2

Anonymous said...

STRATFOR thinks that they, just like the US State Department, are the ultimate word on everything, but they are not at all correct in many of their opinions at all. They mess up all the time, in fact. Same as the US State Department does.

STRATFOR says this, do they?

"A failed state is one in which the central government has lost control over significant areas of the country and the state is unable to function."

Using STRATFOR's totally incorrect and very incomplete definition, they would have been having us earlier call Peru and Colombia 'Failed States', too, but neither was then, and today neither is Mexico a 'Failed State'. The Mexican government is functioning today and so does the weakened Mexican economy as well.

And anybody who thinks that the US backed Mexican military cannot function at all is completely out of their mind! They are corrupt and screw up quite a lot, but they still are quite a killing machine. Let's hope that the US does not turn them totally lose on the hapless Mexican population. Then you would truly see Hell on Earth break loose.

Buela says that the Pentagon says the following, and he is correct about that...

'US joint forces command recommended that Messico be monitored along with Pakistan as a WEAK and FAILING STATE that potentially could crumble swiftly..

So what though? The US government thinks it is their total right to run both Pakistan and Mexican completely at D.C.'s own will, so they try to justify that with opinions such as these. It proves nothing though... Except that the US is an imperialist country. What a surprise! They want to justify keeping the options of entering directly with the US military completely open. Is this really new? Mexico is not exempt at all from US military and political interventionism, whether covert or overt. It's already going on, in fact.

Ernest1

Anonymous said...

"Using STRATFOR's totally incorrect and very incomplete definition, they would have been having us earlier call Peru and Colombia 'Failed States', too"

At the height of the Colombian FARC and the drug cartels in Colombia it pretty much was a failed state. FARC controlled a significant part of the country, albeit mostly jungle but still controlled it.

It wasn't until the U.S got involved militarily with it's own people and weapons that things started to turn around.

As far as Mexico goes, it's headed towards a big storm in the future. One important aspect is the reform to the ejido system by Salinas de Gortari in the 90's. Lot's of farmers have sold or are selling their land and guess what they spend all their lump sun and now have no money , no land and no outlet to the United States via immigration.

The old farmers won't do anything but their sons and grandchildren will need to get money from somewhere. The country is a powder keg not due to the drug war but due to the vast inequalities present today. In fact I would argue the drug trade and problems related to it are also a byproduct of the vast inequality and lack of opportunities. All these people who lead drug cartels and who work the logistics might be excellent CEO's or logistics personnel but they don't have the chance because in Mexico it doesn't matter how smart you are or how hard you work. What matters is who you know and who your family knows. A powder keg no doubt.

Anonymous said...

As for Colombia having been supposedly a 'Failed State' until the US, a foreign power, begin to sink billions upon billions of dollars into militarily involving itself in the control over the Colombian population??? Do you see what might just be wrong with that picture, Anonymous(12:57)?

I would make the argument that any country that allows another country to dominate its politics is the 'Failed State', if any should be called that. Haiti, in the Americas, is a good example of just that state. Instead, you are making the argument that Mexico is a 'Failed State' UNLESS it opens the flood gates to TOTAL US interventionism, as Colombia's Rightist government has done. This is a doubtful idea.

The US government has already sunk its fangs deep into Mexico's neck as it is. And Colombia to this day has absolutely not solved any of its very real and long standing problems, but has just become a puppet governmental regional death squad ally of the US government, while most of its population still remains mired in daily violence and deep poverty. What more violence an war making lies ahead for Colombia because of what the US is doing there?

It's sad, but Mexico if it does not resist, it truly is headed more and more into that direction of sinking alongside the sinking, and YES stinking, US Empire. It is to be marginalized like Central Americans have always been marginalized by the dominance of the US? Dominated like Colombia's population has become by aggressive militarized billions of dollars being pumped in from D.C. for war? What an ugly future that will be. Uglier than even what we are beginning to see already.

Ernest1

''lito'brito said...

.i never said it WAS a failed state..i said NEAR to a failed state ...BIG DIFFERENCE!...

and actually on the news just a minute ago ..they were saying it was muy tranquillo in the city...the cold is keepin it down..

Buela said...

E1 you kill me...make up your mind am I hussy? or he? or Hussy-he?

I posted a response that was directed at if/if not Messico is a failed state. I actually agreed with you...sort of, about as close I dare come without making an appt with a shrink.

I have no interest in engaging in a discussion of mid-east or Guate in the 70s or any other bambastic tirade of yours.

You bore me...you are a time waster for me and cannot answer a direct question....like listening to my Itunes playlist and expecting a song to be different...won't happen..


La Hussey-Man

Anonymous said...

Why allow connected to the hip of the US government Think Tanks to define for anybody what a 'Failed State' is, or is not? By their definitions we'll just be hearing in the days ahead that Mexico is a 'Failed State', unless Mexico's government allows let's yet more US interventionism in, while we'll never hear totally controlled puppet governments of the US, like the Iraqi, Haiti, and Afghanistan regimes ever labeled as being 'Failed' ones.

For example, do any of these Think Tanks based in the US ever talk about the (Kosovo)-Kosova government as being 'Failed"? No they don't. Yet by any sane definition it should be called that if the idea has any real meaning. The unemployment there is around 60% and the per capita income is only about 1/4 that of Mexico's making it Europe's poorest ...uh...'country'. Sounds 'Failed' to me. Certainly much more so 'Failed' than the Mexican State is.

Another comparison? Is Mexico by US to be called a 'Failed State' by US Think Tanks pushing for more US government inspired 'drug war' there, while Guatemala and Honduras are not?

'Police ordered to stay at station in Monterrey' does not show that Mexico is some 'Failed State'. There are still plenty of police and soldiers all over Mexico, including certainly in Monterrey.

Ernest1

La Hussy Man said...

BLAH-BLAH-BLAH!!!!!!!Boring E1...Boring... you only got me for one paragraph this time...before I knew it was you. Easily indentified.

Can't you do us a favor...enter your E1 in the box that says name...so I can see it is another one of your repetious rantings, and not bother to link on to the comment?

La Hussy-Man

Ovemex said...

@Brito

Federal police and soldiers are not "beat cops", you see them in convoys patrolling and responding to calls and tips, but federal police are used for highways, not driving or walking through colonies, soldiers less, they enter colonies for patrols and to respond to specific threats.

Municipal and state police have access to colonies, to actually "walk the beat".Now that may change not that mayor Larry has requested federal back up and militarization of the city.

If Calderon approves, soldiers and feds will be given access to all parts of the city and suburbs. For now, at least, the State/ city is in charge of security.

ajulio said...

Buela chivis vs ernest1 : round 122 Ding! Ding!

Anonymous said...

Ernest1 8:04

When I said failed state, nowhere did I call for U.S intervention. I agree with you on the Colombia situation, it's right wing government beholden to the United States, not a good thing in the long run.

I based my failed state assertion on the vast inequality and the failure of the Mexican security forces to protect the general public. Also add to that the fact that the criminal elements often times operate at will(with the exception of La Familia).

I could care less on what Stratfor considers a failed state, as a citizen of Mexico I sure as hell consider it a failed state, everywhere I look I see failure. If we don't admit the state overall has failed it's citizens we can never begin to repair it.

''lito'brito said...

amen ..the state failed the people a long time ago

Anonymous said...

'I could care less on what Stratfor considers a failed state, as a citizen of Mexico I sure as hell consider it a failed state, everywhere I look I see failure.'

Hell, I don't blame you at all for feeling that way. I feel as a citizen of the US, that this US government so many seem so adamant on defending to the death is a Failing Empire. Everywhere I look I see failure, too. When the Empire is failing it drags a lot of other places down with it, and Mexico is one of those places.

Ernest1

Anonymous said...

Poster claims to be living in Monterrey, attempting to leave because of the violence.

http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/fsx0c/iama_mexican_living_the_drug_violence_first_hand/

I read this site often and find it very informative, please give this guy a bump, more people should hear first hand accounts of what they're going through.

Post a Comment

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com