Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War

Mexican Troops Seize Cartel Arsenal

Friday, October 15, 2010 |


Army troops confiscated drugs and an arsenal including rocket-launchers from a house in the western state of Jalisco, Mexico’s defense department said.

Soldiers discovered the weapons after receiving a tip about the presence of armed men at the home in the Agua Blanca neighborhood of the city of Zapopan.

The cache included 51 rifles and 49 handguns, two rocket-launchers, 20 grenades and nearly 38,000 rounds of ammunition, the defense department said.

Also seized were 18 kilos of methamphetamine, a small quantity of cocaine and an SUV.

The official statement didn’t mention any arrests.


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15 Borderland Beat Comments:

Anonymous said...

God Bless the mexican troops.

Anonymous said...

There are no American made weapons in this photo. This is a photoshopped picture prepared by the American anti-gun liberal media.


Move along dummy... there's nothing to see...

Anonymous said...

youre right i can see they cant use Clipping paths.
NOT!

Anonymous said...

I blame the SUV!

Anonymous said...

Exclusive weapons they have gotten. Maybe it was coming from the middle east? They exchange arsenals for drugs? Who knows? Drug lords and Bin laden.... maybe they have connection.

Anonymous said...

Or maybe from the US..maybe they have a connection...who knows haha

Anonymous said...

Y'know, Colt licenses other companies in other countries to make M-16-ish rifles. These didn't have to come from the U.S.

The rocket launchers are interesting. Wonder who they bought off.

Anonymous said...

No license needed to make AR pattern rifles as the patents on it have expired. That is why every rifle manufacturer in the US makes AR pattern rifles.

For what it is worth if those are select-fire or full auto ARs they may well have been produce in the US and then sold to the Mexican government or given over as part of an aid package. Which of course means they were either stolen or purchased from the Mexican police/military and that is not the fault of the US.

Anonymous said...

@October 18, 2010 6:39 PM

Its funny you say they were given to the mexican police/military when that is false. Do you even know what type of gun the mexican military uses? I'm guessing by your answer you do not Sir, so get your facts straight before you start making false accusations and maybe you should provide proof also!! By the way they used the G3 for a while, now they use the FX-05, a G36 knockoff but again don't you think we would be seeing more G36 on the streets instead of AR-15 if they were getting them from the mexican military?? Saying the AR-15 were part of the aid package given to Mexico by the US and blaming Mexico for why these weapon are in criminal hands is another way of saying that most Americans want to blame there responsibility on firearm control on the Mexicans when the sad fact is they do come from the US, bought legally or illegally. DUH!!! Just read the recent arrest of the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics undercover agent Francisco Javier Reyes Luna also reported by Borderland Beat on Aug. 13 2010 maybe u should read it. He is facing three counts of federal firearm violations. Then come talk to me about where the cartels get there guns??

Anonymous said...

@ October 18, 2010 11:40

If you were to check Jane's Special Forces Recognition Guide, Ewen Southby-Tailyour (2005) p. 446 you will see that the M16 rifle is indeed in use by Mexican military and police forces. You will also find that the M16 rifle is in use Peru, Panama, Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, Ecuador, Chile, Brazil, Bolivia, and Belize.

You will also note sir that I mentioned if they are select-fire or full auto their likely source was various government armories. This is because since the National Fire Arms Act of 1986 no new full auto weapons have been produced in the US. Further the cost, in excess of $10,000, and the paperwork through the ATF make the exercise of getting SF/FA weapons for trafficking prohibitively expensive and inefficient. It would be far easier and more logical, given cartel infiltration of different security agencies and the use of plata y plumba (SP?) intimidation, to get those SF/FA weapons inside Mexico or other countries that the drugs are trafficked through.

Your response?

Signed October 18, 2010 6:39 PM

Anonymous said...

@October 19, 2010 5:43 AM

First off Sir, I just want to let you know I was in the mexican military and recently got out. Yes, I know special forces mainly use the M16 but those are GAFES and also we use do M16 when we do cross training. Second there is a huge difference between the AR-15 and the M-16. In the first paragraph you were talking about AR-15 and stated "For what it is worth if those are select-fire or full auto ARs they may well have been produce in the US and then sold to the Mexican government or given over as part of an aid package. Which of course means they were either stolen or purchased from the Mexican police/military and that is not the fault of the US." And now you say its now the M16 which are completely different weapons. The primary differences that should be noticed include the difference in the milling of the internal portion of the M-16 receiver including a longer fire control group (FCG) cavity and deep shelves. This additional space is needed to allow the GI auto sear to fit, allows the arm of the auto sear to interact with the selector, and provides a surface of the spring of the auto sear to contact. The other two differences which I hope are obvious include the auto sear on the right as well as the "J" hook or spur on the M-16 hammer. I'm sorry I cant go into much detail in this issue right now bz im at the airport and have a plane to catch but just read the ATF reports, here are the links:

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09709.pdf

http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/bitstreams/19331.pdf

And again you didn't provide any information regarding the traffic of arms from South America to Mexio, you make accusations by saying. "far easier and more logical" but you didn't even cite not one reference, again its not what you know, its what you can prove jaja...have a good day, Sir bye.

Your response?

October 18, 2010 11:40 PM

Anonymous said...

I never denied that weapons are being smuggled from the US into Mexico. I also believe that you are picking nits on the difference between the nomenclature I was using. When I say AR pattern rifle or M-16 you should be well aware of what it is I am talking about. It is also these differences that make my point. IF the weapons are full auto/select fire then they cannot becoming from the US because civilian AR pattern rifles will not fit the auto seer and other pieces that make the rifle an M-16 and not an AR pattern rifle. This goes on top of the scarcity, price, and legal hurdles in acquiring the small number of pre-1986 manufactured civilian owned M-16/ARs here in the States.

You ask for studies and no I don't have them. I am left to wonder does anyone have studies showing what the flow of weapons is along the drug corridors? It is much easier to do a study on what guns are coming from controlled gun markets in the US than it is to do them from uncontrolled black-markets further south.

Just because some weapons come from the US does not mean that more weapons do not come from other sources. I would argue further that having hand grenades and rocket launchers, which are impossible to come from the US civilian market (which is the target of most "blame the American" arguments), further bolster the assertion that more and more powerful weapons are either coming from Mexican or other Latin American government arsenals.

Your response?

Anonymous said...

At least some of those 'AR15-type' weapons are M4s with barrels under 16", which means they didn't come from a US gun shop.

Also, that ATF report was written to justify their enormous and ever-expanding budget.

Anonymous said...

Correct me if I'm wrong anonymous, but the first and third rifles from the left in
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_uQt7YfFGA3U/TLfhMCdc5yI/AAAAAAAAHjE/GR8y75VjPqI/s1600/zapopanjaliscoweapons01.jpg
are H&K G3s, which are still used by the Mexican army. #7 & 8 may also be G3 variants, but the angle makes it hard to tell.
So far they have not been fully replaced by the FX-05. I expect some come from deserters, and some "vanished" during the replacement process.

Anonymous said...

cia manufactured ar pattern rifles in mexico back in the 80s, whos to say those factories arent still up and running. think about it mexico manufactures everything from altinators to toilet seats, why not rifles?

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