Thursday, September 9, 2010

Crime rates are worse in Texas, claims Monterrey study

comparrison


Although Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is suffering through it's worse security crisis in history, a report made public yesterday by the citizen awareness organizaion, Nuevo Leon Seguro, states crime rates in neighboring Texas cities are the same, if not worse.

The organization's founder, Roel Santiago, said homicide and auto theft statistics in San Antonio and Houston, two cities which have become popular alternatives for emigrating regios seeking secure environments, are alarming to say the least and should be reviewed before choosing to abandon Monterrey.

The study is based on reported incidents of homicide, auto theft, rape, and assault in rates per 100,000 habitants in the following five cities: San Antonio, Houston, Monterrey, San Pedro, and San Nicolas.

According to the report, homicide rates for Houston(13.1) and San Antonio (8.6)are higher than Monterrey, which stood at seven crimes per 100,000 inhabitants in the first quarter of 2010.

Additionally, the comparison showed that the capital of Nuevo Leon has a rate of 601 auto thefts versus 680 vehicles stolen in San Antonio and 592 in Houston.

During the months of January to March this year, the period which was studied, one thousand 737 thousand vehicles were stolen in Monterrey, surpassing the reports received for this crime in San Antonio (1285) and Houston (1207), but when considering the population factor, the rate is reduced.

















Roel Santiago, who specializes in government quality control, explained that these statistics indicate that Texas cities are as violent and insecure as Monterrey, information one should consider carefully before making the decision to move to the United States.

"It's not the whole complete picture because we are not contemplating the issues that are currently hitting us hard such as kidnapping, extortion and police corruption within the police.

However, this study and these statistics show American cities are also violent. It shows they are not exempt of homicides and auto thefts, and that they, too, are faltering in this so called war on drugs. They accuse us of such crudeness and violence, all I can say to the American government is, well, mirror, mirror. Take a look,said the founder who also created the Crime Traffic Light


Ironically, this crime report was made public on the very same day the federal government announced 30 percent of the municipalities benefiting from federal resources to combat crime are not providing crime statistics to the national database.

The terms for recieving federal security funds allotted by the Municipalities and Public Safety Delegations (Subsemun) grant dictate each municipality must submit reports, which summarize each event constituting a crime and / or administrative offense with photos, map plotting, georeferencing, description of facts and any other documentation, for the consultation and analysis of National Public Security System (SNSP) authorized personnel.

According to a SNSP document, updated July 15, the Nuevo Leon municipalities of Monterrey, San Pedro, San Nicolas, Guadalupe and Escobedo are not in compliance with these terms.

The mayors of Escobedo and Guadalupe claimed to have lost the passwords to enter the system. Monterrey and San Nicolas blamed their omissions on system failure, somehow it just wasn't capturing all the data entries they had sent. San Pedro, on the other hand, announced as of August, they are up to date on all reports.

While municipal records have not been kept tidy, El Norte keeps a running count of drug war related homicides. According to their report, which was last updated Aug. 30, 2010, there has been a total of 433 reported homicides: 351 criminals, 51 police officers, 6 soldiers, and 25 civilians. Again, these are only drug war related homicides and, of course, also exclude unreported events and any number of bodies undiscovered in narco-fosas.

While I most definitely agree, the U.S. is not exempt to violent crime, attempting to validate Monterrey's non-existent security by publicizing butchered facts goes far and beyond the absurdity of 'comparando peras con manzanas'.

Even the simple comparison of homicide and auto theft statistics, on it's own, is ludicrous. Correct me if I'm wrong, but there's a hell of alot of difference between having your vehicle stolen from your local Walmart parking lot in Texas and having a 17 year old, AK-47 wielding cholo rip you and your family from your moving vehicle during a downtown Monterrey narco-bloqueo.

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There's also quite a difference between being killed in a Houston robbery attempt and being extorted, kidnapped by local police, tortured and executed by narco thugs.

These are the reasons Regios are abandoning the city they love, not murder and car theft.

In the end, I'm not sure which shocked me most: the study itself, or the fact it was created and displayed by a non-governmental organization which claims to be auditing government agencies in the name of security.

If this study and a crime traffic light are the only examples of what this citizen watchdog group has to offer the people of Nuevo Leon, I'd say it's time to put the dog down and get a new one.

20 comments:

  1. Yeah Texas looks worst because here, everybody reports the crimes, in Monterrey everything is control by corrupt people so not everything goes into the reports, common sense..lived thru that already...

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  2. I suspect a further analysis of the homicide numbers will lead to discover that most of the Texas numbers are murders by friends/family. Meanwhile, most of the Nuevo Leon murders are not.

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  3. Very interesting! Homicides in the USA compared to Mexico, how do you compare a few people shot dead and a collection of heads torsos hands legs displayed in a macabre arrangement in front of a children's museum. USA has had a hanging from time to time but i have seen as many as four headless nude and sexual organ removed bodies hung from public bridges. The most I ever saw in Mexico was 16 headless humans being drained of blood hanging by their ankles, heads stacked against the wall. I could go on for about another hour but you get my point i hope. The people leaving Mexico and moving to Texas are not running to the big cities anyway if you study the real estate trends of the smaller cities. Just one small city I know of swelled with 400 Mexican families. Believe me whats going on in Mexico is like hell on earth for anyone that is living in it.

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  4. You need to stop badgering the US and step to the plate. There is bad people all over the world but Mexico has allowed evil to take over. Texas deals with crime and does not turn a blind eye. Texas prosecutes and incarcerates evil people for their crimes. Fix your government, Citizen's of Mexico need to come together and fight back. Burn all the fields, put chips on all the cartels. Instate the death penalty. Provide higher wages, Mexico take care of your people. May God Help You All.

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  5. Si pero les falto poner las estadisticas de secuestros,extorciones,asesinatos por no querer mocharse con la cuota,cuantos politicos asesinados, cuantos policias asesinados, cuantos crimenes sin reportar porque todos trabajan para los narcotraficantes.

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  6. This bullshit is why Mexico will NEVER win the so called drug war. I believe nothing they issue as stats...if they say 1000 you can count on two or more times that amount. and the crimes are not comparable. as 5:39 states. And lets deduct the amount of crimes committed by undocumented bad guys and first gen cholitos that think they have few options.

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  7. No one I know bothers to report (protest) a crime in Mexico. About 10% are reported. The Police are usually partners in the crime, if they come to your home, it's an opportunity to "case". The process takes too long (4 to 8 hrs). Headlines like "the murder rate in Crotch, Alabama is 3x Mexico DF!" are a bunch of "caca"

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  8. I guess this REPORT was commissioned by the Monteray Chamber of Commerce ??

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  9. Typical Mexican bullshit, statistics from Mexico are about as useful as an flashlight in the day time. Point the finger of responsibility every which but at yourselves, we have and follow the law here in the U.S. We report and prosecute crimes in the U.S., sure we are.not perfect there is a touch of corruption, but guess what, when it is discovered, IT IS PROSECUTED.

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  10. 90% of crime in Mexico is not reported and at least 95% never goes through the judicial process. So, the crime in Mexico is about 9 times what is reported. As well, how many politicians, those in elected office, police, etc are murdered in the US... no comparison. And, keep in mind the US is one of the more violent countries in the world. Maybe try comparing Mexico's murder rate etc to say Canada's and in so doing one would be shocked.

    Narcos operate with total impunity and most will never be apprehended.

    My concern is the average Mexican of which 45,000,000 (45%) live in poverty and every single aspect of their life is affected. Meanwhile, fewer and fewer run for elected office so who with integrity will lead any aspect of this country?

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  11. uhuh...and so what is the point...make excuses... blame the USA ..some more ...it is getting abburido...pero i do agree that American citys are very dangerous....mostley due to racial problems, this is especially apparent in Houston which had a big influx of blacks after katrina...i feel safe enough in most parts of Monterrey ...and i am very blanco...the problem in Monterrey is not the common people ..it is with the out of control gang war...it is hard to compare a Mexican city to an American city...like comparing manzanas y naranjas...i think there is a lot of personal violence in the USA, whereas in Mexico it is more impersonal...still Mexico shouldn't try to avoid responsability for it's problems and excuse them by shifting blame to the USA...

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  12. I know personally that most crimes are not reported in monterrey, why? ..no confidence in the police..if i am a victim of a crime here , i probably will not report it , especially if it is commited by some gang allied person, why? ...fear, and the knowledge that the police will not or can not protect me from the criminals....so i would guess that the statistics are wrong.....less reported crime in Monterrey means exactly that,LESS REPORTED CRIME .... NOT LESS ACTUAL CRIME...everybody has bars over the doors and windows here in Mexico for a good reason...in the USA the criminals fear the police ...in Mexico everybody fears the police ...EXCEPT THE CRIMINALS

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  13. I agree with all of you, that's why I posted this. It was simply too absurd to ignore.

    I've seen statistics that try to compare apples to oranges, but this is study might as well attempt to compare sugar to, well, mierda.

    Even the justification of the study is ridiculous:

    • Justification
    – Homicide and Motor Vehicle theft are 100% comparable as there is practically no undenunced
    crimes.
    – Rape and Assault are not comparable at 100% since the reporting method is different in Mexico.

    Reporting methods for all crimes are different in Mexico, says the study. Of course they are, there is very minimum reporting, and even if they ARE reported, the municipalities do NOT report them to the federal government.

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  14. Well that settles it i am moving out of Texas today and moving to Monterey.

    I cant believe i have lived around all this crime and never noticed it.

    I well send all my friends my address in a week.

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  15. What denial and smoke-and-mirrors this is. There is a failure here to admit that the violence in Mexico threatens the integrity of an already wobbling state and social structure. Major sectors of the Mexican state are crumbling!

    The US has strong reporting of crimes, many of which are crimes of passion. Mexico has sketchy reporting of offenses by wide spread organized crime, including all levels of government. This is a pathetic failure to wake up and get into the solution. Just the kind of delusion that got this failing state into this wringer. I raise my hands. So sad.

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  16. Yea, that's why all the Texans are fleeing to Mexico.

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  17. Pathetic!!!...and the question still is...is MTY safe? so they're basically saying he have it real bad here...crime..murder...narco bloqueos...kidnappings...but...wait...there is a worse place...and is called SA and Houston...how lame!!...by saying there is a city in TX with higher crime rates than MTY...they have solved the problem in MTY??? are statistics going to protect the regular citizen from all this wave of violence in the city??

    The whole city is full of criminals....just a few days back a "normal,regular a-hole" picked up a dolly and threw it at other fans at a Tigres match(right? how in the hell was he able to get a dolly in the stadium?)....that's not gang related but it gives you an idea how short-tempered they are in MTY..they other guy is in coma at the local hospital

    Maybe Houston and SA are getting worse because all those MTY people moving up there.

    I lived in both cities and even though SA is a dangerous city, MTY is even worse righ now...this is not a biased comment since I am from MTY

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  18. The bad thing is now we have all these people who are trying to get away from it all and come to the u.s. not knowing that they hurt our taxes when they do.

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  19. THIS IS BULL SHIT I LIVE IN MEXICO MONTERREY AND ITS FUCKED UP HERE I SEE ON THE NEWS 10 TO 15 PEOPLE DIE A DAY THIS CITY FUCKED UP EVERYONE IN MY TOWN HAS GOTTEN ROBBED MORE THAN TWICE MY NIEGHBORS GRANDMA AND FRIENDS ...CITY FUCKED UP EVEN THUG NIGGAS GETTIN ROBBED

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  20. If more people come to this nation the economy will have gain because they will spend their money here and they will be taxed here, so its stupid to think that because more people come across we will be affected if those that live here would do their jobs others would not be hired to do it for them.

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