Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Merida Initiative for 2010

U.S asks congress for 310 million dollars under Merida Initiative.

Washignton DC - On Monday, the United States Government solicited congress for the allocation of 410 million dollars to Latin America for the fiscal year 2011, starting October 1st. The money would be used to support counternarcotics efforts in Mexico and Central America under the Merida Initiative.

Deputy Secretary of State, Jacob Lew, noted in a press conference that Mexico would receive 310 million dollars and Central America the rest, manifesting the need to advance to the next stage of the Initiative.

“We are working very closely with the Mexican government”, he said, also indicating that there exists efforts to strengthen institutions and law enforcement while supporting activities that improve human rights.

The Mexican Government considers the new budget request of 310 million dollars as a confirmation of U.S commitment to deepen bilateral cooperation, outlining a new faze oriented less around equipment and more on institutional fortification.

Proposed Cuts in U.S. Aid to Latin America Reflect Changing Priorities.

President Barack Obama’s proposed budget plan for fiscal year 2011 would decrease aid to Latin America by nearly 10 percent, mostly by cutting military and police support. Released on Monday, the plan—a blueprint of the president’s budget priorities that will now be debated in Congress—calls for economic development aid in the region to stay about the same, while aid for health programs would increase. Obama’s budget proposal increases overall spending by the State Department, with much of the proposed increase going toward programs in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Colombia and Mexico, currently the largest recipients of U.S. aid in Latin America, would receive less funding in 2011 under Obama’s plan. Deputy Secretary of State Jacob Lew said the cuts represent the Plan Colombia and Merida Initiatives moving on to less costly phases. Most of the helicopters the U.S. promised Mexico to help counter drug cartels under the Merida Initiative, for example, have already been purchased. Colombian Minister of Defense Gabriel Silva, however, plans to ask U.S. congressional leaders to maintain support for Plan Colombia when he travels to Washington on Monday.

The Obama plan would cut aid specified to combat drug trafficking by $16 million, especially in Colombia, although anti-narcotics programs across the region would still receive $690 million in 2011. Assistance directed toward Latin American development initiatives would essentially remain constant with 2010 funding, with $736 million allocated for programs such as alternative agriculture techniques, judicial reform in Colombia and support for Cuban civil society.

Cutting aid to Colombia, calling for greater parity between military and development spending, and increasing aid to Central America were also priorities reflected by the Obama administration in its 2010 budget requests.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com