Saturday, February 4, 2017

THE BORDER WALL: MAKING MEXICAN DRUG CARTELS GREAT AGAIN

After a campaign of “sending rapists,” “deportation force,” “whip out that Mexican thing again,” and “bad hombres,” the Trump administration has moved from the theatrical to the practical in its first steps to build a new wall along the U.S.-Mexican border. Prior to the inauguration, President Donald Trump’s transition team approached the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Interior Department about a new physical border. In his first week in office, Trump signed an executive order instructing the Department of Homeland Security to repair existing portions of the border fence and to build new sections as authorized by Congress in 2006. Although the new administration is clearly moving to fulfill its campaign promises, the results of a new physical barrier will likely have a counter-intuitive effect: Mexican drug cartels will grow stronger.

Since 2006, when the Mexican government declared war on the drug cartels, the United States has increased its law enforcement, military, and intelligence cooperation with its southern neighbor. With U.S. support, Mexican authorities have been able to kill or capture 33 out of the 37 most dangerous cartel leaders. The recent extradition of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman to the United States is a testament to the value of high-level cooperation between the two countries. As a result of these notable successes, several larger cartels have fractured and have descended into in-fighting.


However, in the midst of the pressures leveled against them and despite the significant damage to their organizations, Mexican cartels have adapted and continue their trafficking enterprises. In the face of new border realities, they will adapt again based on the rules of the game that they follow.

Rule 1: A Cartel’s Business is Business

In many ways, drug cartels are similar to legitimate profit-making enterprises. They seek to fill market demand or stimulate new demand for their products. Mexican cartels profit by using their capabilities to expand into new drug markets and to smuggle drugs and other illicit commodities through innovative and secret means. Mexican cartels are “vicious firms,” earning money as organizations engaged in providing vice (primarily drugs, but also counterfeit consumer goods and human trafficking services) across a sovereign border.

The only law that cartels do not break is the law of supply and demand. Increased security along the border will not change demand for the goods and services that the cartels supply. In fact, as new barriers along the border increase risks for the cartels, they will innovate smuggling operations, raise their prices to keep profits flowing, and stimulate new domestic markets in Mexico and on the U.S. side of the border. These adaptations occurred after 9/11, the last time the United States seriously tightened its border security.

Rule 2: Borders are Opportunities, not Obstacles

Flowing from Rule 1, a new border is a boon for Mexican cartels because they provide incentives to generate profit. Thwarting border protections is an industry in its own right.  Whether it is developing tunnels under the border or providing false documentation to get through a border checkpoint, Mexican cartels will still own the market for the ways and means to move products to the United States. Paradoxically, cartel profits may increase if NAFTA is renegotiated in ways that raise costs to Mexican manufacturers. Some cartels are deeply embedded in legitimate parts of the Mexican economy and have logistics positioned along the border to assist in the movement of legal goods smuggled through ports of entry to avoid high tariffs. Although NAFTA greatly eased the ability of drug cartels to move their products through looser customs inspections, drastically curtailing many provisions of NAFTA provides increased opportunities for smuggling.

Cartel opportunities for southbound smuggling from the United States into Mexico may also increase if the Trump administration clamps down on remittances sent to Mexico from Mexicans in the United States as a way to pay for the border wall. Cartels are adept at moving large sums of money into Mexico. They have used “cloned” vehicles that resemble official cars to transport money close to the border where they can pass it to their associates on the other side. Cartel members have also routinely placed hundreds of thousands of dollars on vast numbers of gift cards to reduce bulky shipments of cash and thereby decreasing law enforcement’s ability to detect the movement of money. Cartels will likely continue to find ways to innovate such tactics in an environment where moving legitimate money southbound becomes more difficult.

A new border wall will be accompanied by the hiring of 5,000 more Border Patrol officers and 10,000 immigration agents. However, more agents and officials equal more opportunities for profit and corruption. To move products through tightened security, cartels have routinely focused on penetrating Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Since the Mexican drug wars began in earnest in 2006, almost 200 Department of Homeland Security employees and contractors took nearly $15 million in bribe money. “Owning” one of these officials allows the cartel to sell access to particular portions of the border to any paying customer.

Ironically, other potential money making opportunities for Mexican drug cartels are in the areas that will undergo new construction of the border wall. Many portions of the border exist in isolated regions. Construction crews living and working far from populated areas will be susceptible to illegal ways to fend off boredom. This is similar to what occurred in remote parts of the United States where fracking sites blossomed as well as incidents of prostitution and drug use. Along the southwest border, Mexican cartels could have a ready-made customer base.

Rule 3:  Cartels have their own STEM Programs

Similar to legitimate businesses, Mexican cartels seek to innovate by relying on core competencies of their employees. But a cartel’s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics competencies are directed towards their more important STEM programs — surveillance, trafficking, extortion, and murder. Tunnels with running electricity, HVAC systems, and rail lines are only small examples of the technical prowess of Mexican cartels.  They have used sophisticated methods to jam and “spoof” Border Patrol’s surveillance drones. Mexican cartels have even hired technical experts to develop custom made “narco drones” to deliver drug loads over the border.

Beyond technical achievements in trafficking, cartels have used extortion and murder to compensate for any curtailment of the drug trade. For example, in 2013, Monterrey, Mexico experienced a wave of kidnappings as violence among the cartels interfered with their ability to move drugs to the United States. Cartels have also extorted teachers, threatening them with death if they do not hand over large portions of their paychecks to local drug gangs. A new wall will also create jockeying for the control of new access points, which often turns violent. In previous periods of heightened violence, the ancillary market for murder created multiple opportunities for new hitmen to enter the fray, which at one stage led to a glut in the market and a drop in the price of contracting a killing in Mexico.

Rule 4: Cartels are also Patriotic

While El Chapo was on the run after his second prison break, he took the time to Tweet a threat against candidate Donald Trump for insulting Mexicans. Members of Mexican cartels often view themselves as patriots, just like any other Mexican. They are not isolated from their communities, but are rather deeply embedded. As two scholars on gang violence described, “they spend more time hangin’ than bangin’.” The cartels have invested in the local communities by supporting soccer teams and throwing celebrations on important national holidays. If U.S.-Mexican relations sour, the cartels are well positioned to support, and benefit from, a new rise in Mexican nationalism. As they have in the past, cartels would use their local influence and their money to bolster political campaigns, but, this time, aimed at those campaigns touting Mexican sovereignty and anti-Americanism. Nationalism couched in anti-Americanism would help the cartels if Mexican political parties view standing against cooperating with the United States as an electoral advantage. Some of this political positioning was already occurring in Mexico even before Trump’s election. However, reducing or ending cooperation in areas like law enforcement, intelligence, and defense would be a gain for Mexican cartels. The threat of extradition to the United States would also likely begin to recede for cartel members as Mexican politicians refuse to undertake any actions that would look like a political gain for the Trump administration.

The Game may have Changed, but the Old Rules Still Apply

The rules that Mexican drug cartels have used successfully in the past demonstrate how the cartels can change their practices to thwart state actions which interfere with their ability to make money. These same rules mean that a new border wall will not end or significantly reduce the capabilities and power of Mexican drug cartels. From the days of tequila smuggling into the United States during Prohibition, illicit trafficking across the southwest border has remained a constant. Only with enhanced cooperation between the United States and Mexico in an atmosphere of trust can the Mexican drug cartels be tackled. A new border wall will only undermine these efforts, to the benefit of the criminal groups that have fueled much of the distrust along both sides of the border.

War On The Roks

109 comments:

  1. I've been reading this site everyday for 10 years or something.
    Fake news

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    1. 10 years! How come you havnt learned yet? Id say ur a pretty stupid dude!

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    2. @ 12:47 come on man he's obviously joking, i laughed my ass off when i read his comment

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  2. This article is idiotic. It gives into the cartels and political corruption that is rampant in Mexico. Nothing will change in Mexico until Mexicans get tired of being bullied by their government. This article is just more of the same. Closing the borders will help Americans.

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    1. The Mexican Cartel is the government. That happened 20 years ago. It will not go away because both US and mexico make money. Hey the connection is in the US. They let it pass, para lana.

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    2. Cartels have been Great . Chivs they have always been great. They r the government

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    3. It's not giving into corruption it's simply stating Facts about the supply and demand history of Cartels

      To call any post on this forum idiotic is just foolish on your part.

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  3. What a bunch of crap! The wall on the border is just one part of securing the US border. Drugs will continue to flow from Mexico because of the top to bottom corruption in Mexico.
    Lets face it Mexico is second world country. Slightly better then third world countries.
    When you can buy the lowest cop or politician up to the Mexican President himself nothing matters.
    The best way for the USA to stop the Cartels would be to send in to Mexico a covert assignation team taking out people like Mayo, RCQ, H2, the Guzman Boys, and other top level narco's till no one wants the job.

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    1. If those guys die other will replace them u obviously don't understand how deep drug trafficking runs in Mexican culture boy

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    2. you sure dont know how cartels works. they need to wipe alot of families lots of them.villages all over mexico LOL.. its not going to changed unless USA stop beign a consumer.
      CHAPODAMASORDEN

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    3. Holy shit this is the most real comment I've ever read on here..
      Munke

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    4. Ignorance is bliss i suppose?
      There's at least 7 federal US agencies in Mexico operating for decades. And im not counting the private agencies they hire. Also funny how Trump never mentions anything about the American criminals banksters and weapon dealers that aid and support the cartels. This goes 2 ways, your country is not innocent and i agree 100% with Trump in that.

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    5. No, no, no the problem is consumption of the drugs. It's the Americans.

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    6. @3:28 why aren't both parties - consumers and suppliers - both responsible for all the drug shit? I, mean drugs in the U.S. "consumption" cause addiction and social problems as well as deaths. Then the suppliers by the same hand cause social problems and even more deaths in Mexico (as well as drug gangs causing deaths in the U.S.), than anyone can imagine.
      This is an issue that needs to be adressed in both sides is my point!

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    7. 7:02pm I halfway agree. It was the Most Real Dumb comment I've ever read here..IT WOULD NOT WORK..You and 8:02 watch too many American hero movies where the Americans never get caught or killed. How long would these assassin be able to remain covert? Some will die in gun battles with the cartels while trying to execute their plan. So eventually it will come out the u.s is behind the hits..Your insight into this is all wrong.

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    8. For @ 3:28AM, so sad you are disillusioned. The drug and alcohol addiction in Mexico surpasses any other nation in the world per capita. There are more drug addicts in Mexico and the majority of babies born are addicted to drugs from usage by the mother. Reports list that 7 of every 10 people in Mexico are addicted to hard drugs or are alcoholics.

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    9. @10;46 You posted some ridiculous numbers like that once before. Would you please give us some source for your "alternative facts".

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    10. @10:46 wow your talking out of your ass now man.

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    11. @1O:46 lol you just can't stand the fact that the unitesd states has a drug problem not saying mexico doesn't but I doubt it's 7 out of every 1O , that's almost laughable.

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    12. There is nowhere in the world where 7 out of 10 ppl are book on hard drugs..Simple as that!

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  4. Please write an article on how the usa and mexico can solve these problems.

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    1. Legalization is the 'least harm' solution! Drugs are about 90% of cartels business and profit. Legalization would make a MASSIVE dent in their buying power (bribes, arms, recruits etc.) and thereby give us all a huge break from this cartel cancer!

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    2. Or just up hold the law in Mexico.

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  5. Viva Mexico putos!!

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    1. Viva mexico? Then why are so many of you little fuckers sneaking I'm here?

      On a more serious note, I love BB, but this article is premised on nonsensical arguments. The border wall will be one layer of defense, not the only defense. Yes some will find ways around it, but it'll be harder than wading across a creak, no? And the cartels already elected a Mexican president did they not? Mexican nationalism? We must have different a definitions of what nationalism means. To me, nationalist sentiment drives improving and defending my nation. NOT sneaking out of it in the middle of the night to another nation, then waving my home nations flag all over my host nation, and bitching about how bad the host nation sucks. Viva mexico? Indeed lol

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    2. 6:25 we are sneaking into the US because it is good business for both sides, because it blows las tripas of a lot of pendejos AND because we are recovering OUR MEXICAN LAND STOLEN BY THE US, it is a beautiful experience to see como te arde el culo, mijo, now we are in Canada too, and alaska...
      ain't nobody stoppin' us, even with BLADDERMIR PUTIN'S HELP.

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    3. I was going to say good comment 6:25Pm..Until I read 9:20 Am's reply about STOLEN LAND...Im with him on that one..I Hate a Thief.

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    4. 5:33 a güeboo! 6:25 es un pendejo, never agree with anybody until somebody else has replied, ain'nobody posessing the truth, always check again.

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    5. 6:25 im a mexican my self and mostof my family members 50plus walk freely in u.s.a illegally. Viva mexico y toda america latina! Haters gona hate...

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    6. 6:25 Everyone get out ratlantics who came from Europe across the Atlantic hidden in leaking boats that's why I call em ratlantics. The Anglos like chump dream of a US with whites only probably like a country like Iceland. I dream of a country with only Navajos Cherokees Sioux ... Everybody get out!!! Chivs can stay I'm in love with her n her wisdom. Comanche

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  6. Excellent description of the realities of the narco business. It is capitalism in its purest form with no rules or boundaries - just the pursuit of supplying demand for the pursuit of profit, and without concern for society, human suffering, etc. The more enforcement (or walls) that make supplying the US market risky, the more profit margin there will be as supply falls short of demand. If in the unlikely event enforcement along the frontera were successful in making smuggling operations non-profitable (where the risk exceeded the reward) traffickers will do as they did when they changed routes from the Caribbean to the US / Mexico frontera. This has already been happening as heroina, mota, cocaine and crystal de china has been pouring into routes along the Canada border into upper Michigan peninsula with well formed routes, lots of tree cover, no people and almost no enforcement (just as it was in Texas in 70-80s). Where there is a demand there will always be a supply, and when a route is no longer profitable another route will replace it. Laws of capitalism as old as mankind.

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    1. The chinese containers will be real expensive to move around in canada, couple that with the russian offer to buy the mexican meats and chile's and frijoles and tortillas and the nopales, even walmart will go a chingar a su madre...
      --the US really needs a hole up its ass, after 60 years of cuba...I mean a "wall"...

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  7. If there is a reduction in Mexican/American it will Mexico's choice. The US will continue to work with Mexico, but it's the corruption of Mexican government officials that hinders cooperation. Until Mexicans stand up for themselves there is little that the US can do to really help. Patriotism isn't soccer games and celebrations. It's loving ones country enough to die to ensure its freedoms. In Mexico we see a smattering of real patriotism, but most of the time many so called patriots get turned by threats against themselves and family.

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  8. This type of business needs to be eradicated .
    No ifs or buts. America needs strong borders. We are neighbors but this type of business seems to be well covered by Mexican authorities for any real impact can occur.
    Mexico has long been turning a blind eye , which in my opinion has contributed to the escalation of violence and this behavior.
    This drug war (10 years in the making) was long overdue. Sons of capos are untouchable, assets rarely confiscated. Too much corruption .
    Change laws needed to prosecute judges, government officials, ect. Majority of time I see no official ever getting any time because they carry A GET OUT OF JAIL CARD issued by Mexican government.
    One way or another change for better can only begin from within.

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    1. 8:10 the real big heavy powerful "get out of jail cards" are given by the US, even the donal' is under the influence of speed, watch him, he can't sleep at night, and always comes up with the craziest pendejadas, his gangster partners have been murdered or arrested and kept in solitary confinement, except for rudi giulianni, who got hisself a contract on mexico city for ten million dollars a few years ago, with manuel lopez obrador, (my guess), for which drugs got exported to Niu Yawark, and now la chapa is in prison for it, but the beltranuses and other chilangos were the ones...crime on el DF went high as they had never seen...while now gomba rudi G tries hard to stay tight with the donal', but he can't qualify for a secretary position.

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    2. WHY NOT START CLEANING YOUR OWN COUNTRY FIRST. no demand no sells.. eeeeh. pretty sure mexico will look for other places. so you throw a stone and hide your hand. CHAPODAMASORDEN

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    3. Blind eye because 25 to 30 percent of mx economy is drug money. Also mexicans believed it was a usa problem not their problem which was basicly true until calderon broke up the status quo.

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    4. @6:21 and @8:19 don't forget to specify who you are talking to, less you get friendly fire and flak on your arses.

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  9. Best article ever. Remember there are millions of regular drug users in America. They must get their regular supply of drugs. The USA actually has an interest in seeing that those people continue to receive their "medication" or very serious social unrest would result that the US could not handle. Of course the WALL will not accomplish it's intended purpose. Besides there are many other ways to get drugs into the US. Over the Canadian border for example. To the various Américan Seaports as well. It never stops no matter what.

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    1. It's a problem as old as time itself, since we were kids being told we can't have something makes us want it more I hope people understand this is deeper than corrupt politicians and drug traffickers. Open your eyes folks

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    2. 1:56Pm..Please explain..Open our eyes for us.Exactly how deep is it?

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  10. In reality, Mexico is a violent and lawless place. Only the average small time lawbreaker ever sees prison. Government officials are openly corrupt. Journalists are routinely murdered for reporting the truth. Elections are rigged. Police are extortionists and hitmen. The people remain powerless because there is a leadership vacuum. The dicho for the day is always "no pase nada".

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    1. 8:15 you are one more violent and lawless pendejo, not mexico.
      --The corruption of the mexican government and the cartels is all a gift from the US, that accelerated it with the billions of dollars from the "mierda accords" military equipment and gorilla training, of course, it all happened before you was born, before epn was president...

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    2. In reality Mexico is not a violent and lawless place, however in reality Mexico as does the US have many areas where lawlessness tends to be more rampant because of the same problems both countries face such as unequal protection for the poor, corrupt politicians and enforcement. In reailty Mexico City, Guadalajara, San Luis Potosí, León and many other cities are great places to live that in no way resemble "violent and lawlessness". Educate yourself before you make ridiculous generalizations about an entire country. Very irresponsible and idiotic.

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    3. 6:17 You are delusional....I have lived in the frontera...Tamps and because of the violence moved to Playa del Carmen.Q.R.
      Kid yourself not we are now experiencing the same violence. The media is just not reporting it.Shootout yesterday at 12 noon in broad daylight killing two at an oxxo on a busy street.Bodies being dumped with mantas a couple of times a week. Where do you live in Mexico that it is so safe.Or do you like an ostrich keep your head buried??? The problem is not the corrupt government but the corrupt culture that glorfys the criminals and thieves.corruption is as much of their culture as the tortilla.
      Le Verdad

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  11. This is an almost laughable article. Such one-sided socialist opinionated nonsense. The number one rule here is the US will act militarily against the cartels if this gets any more out of hand. The borders will be defended with full force and the cartels are no match for the US military should we choose to confront them. The wall will not make them more embolden or powerful. The cartels act on stupidity, the members now are low lifes and bottom ladder trash. The shark is circling and that shark is the United States. Personally, this article is like an op-ed which means nothing to the majority of readers but a long exacerbated liberal statement looking at one side and highly opinionated. That is why the socialist regime of Obama no longer exists here in the US. Wake up! We pulled in the reigns before we will do it again if more drugs, illegals or cartels think they can openly move across our borders. Those days of Pancho Villa are now OVER.

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    1. I would be very surprised if the US military goes into Mexico to attack the cartels as you state. Can you imagine what the liberals in USA would do to Trump.

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    2. I definitely agree with you. This just seems to be blah , blah. Sorry I definitely do not see how a wall are making cartels more powerful. If anything it will hurt them on transportation.
      New hurtles and turf wars . Yes drug trafficking will find its way as all black market do. But a strong border presence will curtail some of the poison flooding and killing many.
      I do suggest a testing of our border guards and immigration officials can be implemented. Rather a requirement.
      However expect resistance from union officials for such tests. Corruption is everywhere and by making implements can be a start. Nevertheless I don't see this to get approval.

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    3. 8:37 a real socialist approach is using your useful idiots, the communistas are often confused with the socialistas the same way the fascist and the nazis are confused with the falangistas, and having a stupid gambler that gambled all his motherfacking life on overspending, on defrauding banks left and right, on robbing his investors, and when nobody would lend his ass anymore money, he ended borrowing from the chinese and from the russians and now owes all he's got to them AND A FEW AMERICAN OPERATORS LIKE ROBERT MERCER.
      --on top of it all he is being extorted by BLADDERMIR PUTIN.

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  12. Your article made way too much sense. Stupidity is the way of the American public.

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    1. Our stupidity has made USA the greatest country the world has ever seen. Fake news

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    2. 1:03 American Geniuses beg to differ, they left behind their work and the fruits of their wisdom, other sharks appropriated the benefits, and wrap the fruits of their labors, in patent ownerships and wholesale corruption, I doubt you have ever invented anything other than "we the americans" pretenses, mister fucked up news...

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    3. 8:49 - have to agree with 8:49. America is more wrapped up in celebrity presidents, Beyonce, reality TV, sloth and laziness. They consume more dope per capita than any country in the world, and are the very reason for the demand that we enjoy supplying them for very nice profits. I've travelled all over Europe, Russia, and Latin America and nowhere are the citizens such robots. The politicians just keep the Americans fed, very fat, "happy" and dumb. There are some of the brightest people in USA but by far the masses are dumb sheep who are incapable of thinking for themselves.

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    4. if it's so terrible, corrupt stupid why does everyone want to come here. You would do better if you stopped hating with fake news

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    5. 7:36 your businessmen come to mexico "legally" with passports and visas to steal in mexico where they are not loved or welcome by more than 90% of mexicans...
      --our illegals come to the US to steal your lunch and your lunch box, but a lot of american people love us, more than 50%, whites, blacks, browns, yellows and even the black and blue and the Black Panters, Pink Panthers, Grey Panters and your white calzones cagados love us mexicans.

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    6. The sandinistas also had against them guatemala, honduras, el salvador, Costa rica, peru and the secret contra training camps in veracruz, mexico, used to also transfer loads of weapons and drugs and drug money and rafael caro quintero after he murdered kiki camarena the CIA's cuban felix ismael rodriguez mendigutia and for former US marines Lt. Col oliver north then on the NSA. How do you beat all that from a poor country like nicaragua?
      I have an answer, there was never enough money for the contras, it was all a scam to steal and privatize the drug trafficking profits money, and it was all invested on the Cayman Islands and Panama among other so called "investment houses" then used to buy american enterprises and jobs and offshore them to china...

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    7. 6:24p.m...Leave Beyonce out of this!!!!

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  13. Some good info and thinking and some not so good, and rule 4 is flat out ridiculous. Believing that Chapo tweets, something he and his wife denies, is to bring suspect to the caliber of research involved in this post.

    As for the wall. The wall is one part of a multi action effort to stem drug trafficking and illegal entry. The wall is a double wall, the only type that has proven effective at the south border. In conjunction with cyber technology, tunnel detection, increased boots on the ground etc.

    It will be successful in making the drug journey difficult. History teaches us that when traffickers hit "a wall" they find another way to push drugs into the U.S. their largest drug market. In fact, it was the success of policing water ways that stopped drugs being transported via open waters, and onto land. this caused a presentation of crime in countries that previously were largely unaffected by trafficking, in Central Am, like Honduras, which exploded with crime and violence once drugs moved on shore. Honduras has been consistently the most violent or one of the most violent nations since then.

    Trafficking is one part of the equation, the moving of money is equally important. The U.S. must factor in restrictions and oversight of funds being sent out of the country.

    Hard to say how successful this will be. But if the plan goes forth in concentration on the south border the slow down of drugs will be temporary. As the article says, "it is a business" and as such plans are being carefully crafted to combat U.S. plans to create a rigid border.

    For one thing....the U.S. must take in account the northern border. canadian maritime entries are controlled by organized crime and facilitated by gangs. And the northern border is massive and porous. It cannot be ignored.

    It will be interesting.

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    1. Lol the Northern border between myself and the US is a different beast and where did you get your "facts" that it is controlled by organized crime? One source, one article that says the Canada US border is controlled by organized crime.

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    2. The Trump Wall, as the man himself describes it, will never exist. Just remember Obama's first executive order (also made to fulfill a campaign promise); he ordered Gitmo to be closed, and 9 years later, it's still open.

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    3. Chivis . I worked with a man , here in Texas ,that told me his daughter runs a orphanage in Guatemala . That wouldn't be you ?

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    4. I only work in Nicaragua and Mexico... :)

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    5. @ 10:57... go back a read slowly, that is not what I said. The border is more complex, both borders. I have extensively studies both. but I was not talking about the border.

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    6. Chivis, how do you 'esplain' that Daniel Ortega and the sandinistas defeated the contras and the US in spite of the billions of dollars made in irani weapons, mariguana, cocaina and crack the contras, the CIA, oliver north, felix ismael rodriguez mendigutia, juan ramon matta ballesteros barry seal the caleros and many others like the cartel de guadalajara trafficked to the US???
      PS nice to see you so busy chivis...

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    7. that is correct, drug already flows thru the docks policed by motor cycle gangs.

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    8. I don't try to explain and while I find it it much easier for a non profit to work in Nica, vs Mx, there are aspects that are unsettling. such as they knew much about me and my business while I just placed one foot on the ground.

      It was a childhood friend of mine who asked for my help, herself allied with Sandinista and living in nica then cuba for years. She married a cuban "fled" cuba and has been back in boston for decades.

      I have time until Monday then not so much for a couple weeks, I have surgery next week...

      DD has been carrying the load. we need help badly, I really don't know how much longer we can continue... a sad reckoning. PAZ

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    9. Thought Cuba was a model health care system. Why would u leave

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  14. Every country has the absolute right to protect its borders using ANY means necessary.

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  15. The point of the wall is to stop illegal inmigrants crossing the US border, not whatsoever stop cartel activity, but i truly doubt it will be easier for the cartels to smuggle drugs into the US with a goddamn wall separating both countries. In reality it's not like they can build a tunnel everywhere they want, it's not that easy.

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  16. I strongly agree with "enhanced cooperation between the US and Mexico and an atmosphere of trust will the cartels be defeated." As a law enforcement officer on the southwest border, most of our successes against the cartels have come by working side-by-side with our counterparts from Mexico. We trained together, ate together, socialized together, celebrated success together and have become friends with mutual trust. But this relationship has to be supported and nurtured at the very top of our organizations. The weak, apathetic and lazy leaders can burn bridges that took years to build.

    When you work together and develop trust, each nation better understands the other's challenges and can deal with them together. We also learn to appreciate the beauty of our cultures. But again, this must happen at the highest levels of government.

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    1. 11:02 "operation 40" members were real active in the late 60's and early 70s, fighting the "evil of the day", the socialistas and communistas invented by the US/mexico anticommunist alliance, because they facked up the bay of pigs and ran out of HUEVOS to try there again.
      Easier to come to mexico and fack it up with drug trafficking.

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    2. Thats stupid. Any intelligence or any info the usa shares with mexico it inmediatly gets told to the cartels. The usa needs to take a tougher stand against the mexican government that has lost the initiative in the fight or the will to fight this drug organizations and this gangs. The carnage that goes in mexico by numbers and by its extreme nature makes mexico one of the most dangerous places in the world.Its gotten out of control. Do not deny it. So to the original point a tougher stand against the mexican goverment from the usa is a most.no sharing information no training their soldiers dont give them money nor weapons or equipment untill the regular decent. mexican folks can feel safe again.

      Delete
    3. Good and true but there will be moles on the mx side for sure.

      Delete
  17. Not only the us uses drugs .. the problem exists everywhere like Europe and Australia , but it's always the Mexicans fault according to the new administration. Everything always is the Mexicans fault from working for cheap labor or working real hard we are always the kicking dog and you only can kick the dog so much until it starts biting back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Come on pobre. Stop whining. Mexico is the transit point into the usa and one of the biggest if not the biggest exporter of drugs in del mundo. So get over yourself and your little la raza pity party

      Delete
    2. 8:06 - your not even close to being correct.
      Cocaine - Columbia then Peru largest exporter
      Heroin - Afghanistan largest exporter, no other country even close.
      Methamphatamines - China largest exporter
      MDMA - Holland largest exporter
      Mexico happens to be the largest exporter of Marijuana and the transporter of other drugs from the aforementioned countries into the US, but that is because its US neighbor has the most voracious demand for popping pills, sticking needles in their arms, and shoveling powder and crystal up there nostrils. The less than 1% involved in the Mexican drug trade are simply helping to meet a drug demand of over 16% of American citizens.

      Now which country is to blame?

      Delete
    3. 12:02 that is exacly the truth but white peope like to act like it's Mexicans. I live in Arizona and there are so much racist white people here that it's pathetic lol if there's an election the winner always say things about protecting the border and cartels. The commercials will show Mexicans with guns and crossing drugs like if there is no law lol Napolitano, janett brewer and sherrif joe knew how to scare the white people out their votes lmao but guess what? still no changes and things are still the same. When the DEA and governments are the ones calling the shots and bringing the drugs themselves too and blaming the Mexicans

      Delete
  18. CANADA is the next big thing as far as drug trafficking worldwide is concerned. I hope for some articles on that if possible, as to all the specifics. The one you all did a while back on the port of Vancouver was very good. Thx.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Canadá is already a very big port and export for narcotics. It is the big secret like Ojinaga and the Houston ship Channel from 70-late 80s; but bigger

      Delete
  19. Funny article . LOL . I couldn't read it all . Sounds like the argument of the desperate who feel like they are sinking . Some folks just think different than others . I assume your saying that if the border would get easier the drug smugglers would diminish . Foolish

    ReplyDelete
  20. Lol I read a comment the other day about chivis being a cartel member made me laugh.

    ~ anonymous

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's not even funny it's hella stupid. It's probably a kid taking a shit with nothing to do

      Delete
  21. Excellent article. Big thank you !!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Nonsense, the U.S needs all the drugs Mexicans can send in. It's good for government on so many ways. U.S needs Mexico more than what people fail to realize but the AVERAGE racist white people don't want to admit lol

    ReplyDelete
  23. Kind of crude,that "Chivis is a Zeta' remark.I hope it was meant as a joke but don't think it's too funny.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Walls only make the idiots who believe they actually work feel good. The bulk of illegal immigration occurs from overstaying visas and the drugs drive right past CBP @ the border every day. Every fricken day.

    Ask the Ming Dynasty how well their "Great Wall" worked out. As always, history repeats itself. And in that same vein: Just like the 1st Prohibition made criminals rich, the 2nd Prohibition has done the same. The powers that be love Prohibition, as they should, being the criminals that they are.

    What is so sad is that the 1% feed off the turmoil generated by the Left-Right conflict, and stupid people are too busy arguing to see it. None of them give a crap about the politics and none of them give a damn about any of us. Get that through your thick skulls. Divide & conquer, the oldest game that always works. Always. Just look around.

    I only weep for the nation because my children live there. I will likely be gone before the 6th mass extinction has its final say. Heh, the world is turning to shi+ and you people are arguing about walls. If this crap keeps up, we are more fu<#ed than you could possibly imagine.

    Hasta luego,
    AmigoAnónimo

    ReplyDelete
  25. 11:50 If it turned out to be true I would lose all faith in man kind . The stories on here are almost enough anyway .

    ReplyDelete
  26. no specifics, just general ideas based on nothing. This is Jr High logic.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Invest in drone manufacturing corporation stocks. Demand will increase once the wall is up and the value of your investment will multiply. Drones are the future of drug trafficking!

    ReplyDelete
  28. You probably right lived on the Frontera all my life continue about the same
    Will say since the trump toke the office, it has gotten harder to cross . Hopefully has time goes trump lack up, bringing people across will be easier

    ReplyDelete
  29. U know cartels are the boss. Everybody forgets 43 students and Dr. Meriles.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Mexico, we r not going back. Will miss u. U have chosen Cartels. Best luck

    ReplyDelete
  31. "Cartels are patriotic"! Bwaaaahahahahaha!!!! What a complete line of politically motivated bullshit you just printed. Way to go! If you're looking to turn this site into just another half-truth gossip laden trash site, this article is perfect for your goal. Patriotic??? Killing of mass civilians, extorting citizens whom are trying to make an already arduous journey to America, peddling drugs to your own people for your own financial gain, all in the name of a Patriotic at heart mission? What joke! What a completely half-witted attempt to push ones own political belief. Embarrassing.

    ReplyDelete
  32. "Cartels are patriotic"! Bwaaaahahahahaha!!!! What a complete line of politically motivated bullshit you just printed. Way to go! If you're looking to turn this site into just another half-truth gossip laden trash site, this article is perfect for your goal. Patriotic??? Killing of mass civilians, extorting citizens whom are trying to make an already arduous journey to America, peddling drugs to your own people for your own financial gain, all in the name of a Patriotic at heart mission? What joke! What a completely half-witted attempt to push ones own political belief. Embarrassing.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Here is an example of the "protection" the wall will provide! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHjKBjM1ngw

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 8;59 I think trump is adding Constantine wire

      Delete
  34. @6:32AM
    Your definition of patriotism fits your perspective.

    If you talk shi+ on México or their flag, EVERY Mexican, from the very poorest to Carlos Slim, WILL take issue with you. Expect a violent response. All of the Mexicans I know would call that patriotism. Does it fit the entire definition of patriotism? Absolutely not, but that fact, as well as YOUR belief, is irrelevant to THEM.

    Hasta luego,
    AmigoAnónimo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First of all, I'm not arguing for a wall, nor am I in support. I am taking issue with an article calling cartels "patriotic" as a main point in contention of the wall. I'm Mexican American and a US Marine. My parents came to the country legally, to escape a backwards government. You say every Mexican will respond with Violence? You crack me up pendejo. There is nothing patriotic about a cartel member. And there's no argument you can make in support of those ass-clowns being patriotic. With opinions like yours...well, no wonder we have been reduced to sneaking across a border in the middle of the night, like common house rats, to a country that no longer wants people sneaking in. What's funny to me is that my relatives (in Mexico) feel the same way about Guatemalans that many racist Americans now feel about us. I've read your other responses, and you're basically arguing my point. This article is nonsense and you're arguing just for the sake of arguing.

      Delete
    2. La falta de respeto por medio de groserias te hizo perder el chiste de tu mensaje. No tiene caso seguir así, pero una cosa...ser miembro de la Marina no te hace patriota tampoco.

      Adios,
      AmigoAnónimo
      posdata: Me retire con 53 años y vivo muy, pero muy bién. No conozco ningún pendejo quién vive como yo. A ver como te va la vida con esa actitud malcriada.

      Delete
    3. This is a joke, right? Post us some links of Americans in Mexico trampling the Mexican flag, waving the U.S. flag, demonstrating and rioting because Americans think they should be able to have the same border rules Mexico does.

      Time for you to understand you aren't entitled to march into someone else's country uninvited, and live off of the citizens thereof while openly insulting them.

      Delete
  35. The "wall" will be mostly a fence, and 70% is already built. Bush started it, Obama continued building it, and Trump will build the remaining 30% and take credit for the whole thing.

    The wall/fence doesn't eliminate smuggling, it just raises the cost. For the cartels, if they lose their airplanes, they use their tunnels. If they lose the tunnels, they buy or bribe legitimate businesses and hide the drugs in the legal shipments. If their businesses are seized, they buy more airplanes. Small smugglers don't have that flexibility. So the wall will leave the cartels with an even bigger share of cross border smuggling than they already have.

    As for keeping out immigrants, Scientific American just published an article on immigration research that said this:
    "... immigration does not cause crime to increase in U.S. metropolitan areas, and may even help reduce it... The most common explanation is that immigration reduces levels of crime by revitalizing urban neighborhoods, creating vibrant communities and generating economic growth."

    ReplyDelete
  36. About the dumbest article I have seen on BB . It don't even make sense to a normal thinking person . They will react with violence ? Any normal thinking person would be more persuaded that we need a wall to keep the violence out . You cant bomb us into submission , so to speak . Come to my place and threaten me with violence you will not get what you want but will learn of the 2nd amendment . As a big powerful country we have never submitted to violence or threats of , only reacted . Why is it called racism to want only documented law abiding people within our borders ? We will never get the drugs coming in here under total control but with the right people in charge we will get it reduce drastically . Its odd to me how so many people never see change on the horizon . Being born in the late 50's there is one thing I have learned to be certain THINGS CHANGE .
    Times they are a changin

    ReplyDelete
  37. Just wondering if anybody knows . What was it called when all the Mexicans were forced back to Mexico because of the marijuana trafficking ? Must have been 80 90 years ago . Anybody know ?

    ReplyDelete
  38. One time a old man told me that when you achieve true wisdom is when you realize everything you think you know might be wrong . I think I know that this article is very stupid . Man if I am wrong it will be a rude awakening for me . That would make me awful dumb if it turns out that this author is the polar opposite of how I see him / her

    ReplyDelete
  39. This is a joke, right? Post us some links of Americans in Mexico trampling the Mexican flag, waving the U.S. flag, demonstrating and rioting because Americans think they should be able to have the same border rules Mexico does.

    Time for you to understand you aren't entitled to march into someone else's country uninvited, and live off of the citizens thereof while openly insulting them. Amen

    ReplyDelete
  40. When the buying stops, the killing will stop too...

    ReplyDelete
  41. I am fed up with dope cartels being presented as some sort of corporate entity meeting a "supply and demand" agenda. That scum is murdering our children. They are targeting our children. Even worse, we all see a bunch of crap like this web page -- and even hear and see the same crap coming from officials -- and it is THEY who are facilitating the cartels and making excuses for their dope sales. All we see are cursory attempts by so called "homeland security", ICE and other so called authorities who are supposed to be protecting us FROM the dope and cartels and there they are advertising their cause. Well I'm sick of that crap. Who says America is up for grabs??? The immigration issue is stuck to the dope cartel issue like glue because that is where one of the vehicles for the cartels are. It all has to stop. STOP THE DOPE. STOP THE FACILITATORS REGARDLESS OF WHO AND WHAT THEY ARE. ENOUGH IS ENOUGH.

    ReplyDelete

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