Sunday, April 4, 2010

DPS director: ‘Spillover is here'

The Monitor

Drug violence in northern Mexico has reached a level much worse than that which wracked Colombia two decades ago, and it’s affecting Texans on a daily basis, Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steve McCraw said Tuesday.

Likening Mexican drug cartels to Islamic terrorist groups and the Italian Mafia, the state’s top homeland security official told lawmakers that he expects the situation along the border to deteriorate before it improves.

“Spillover is here,” he said Tuesday in Austin during a hearing of the Texas House Committee on Emergency Preparedness. “I’ve been working cartels since the 1980s, and there has never been a more significant threat.”

McCraw’s testimony comes amid escalating violence in hotspots like the northern border cities of Tamaulipas and an ongoing debate over whether that threat has already spilled over to the U.S.

While local law enforcement officials and the federal government argue that no significant incidents of “spillover violence” — a term they say should include “deliberate, planned attacks by the cartels” — have occurred thus far in Texas, McCraw disagreed.

“The state of Texas defines ‘spillover violence’ as Mexican cartel-related violence that occurs in Texas including aggravated assault, extortion, kidnapping, torture, rape and murder,” he said. “The victims of these crimes include illegal immigrants being smuggled into the United States, Mexican or U.S. citizens working with the cartels or their innocent family members, and those who are not associated in any way with the cartels or transnational gangs.”

This definition would include the dozens of home invasions and drug-related assaults and pursuits that occur across the Rio Grande Valley monthly, he said. But critics argue it casts too wide a net and serves only to frighten local residents by exaggerating the significance of crimes that have been occurring along the border for years.

State Rep. Aaron Peña, an Edinburg Democrat who chairs the committee, asked McCraw to present the state’s official definition of spillover on Tuesday because he felt the current discussion had gotten lost in semantics.

“The reality is, we have a problem,” Peña said. “If you call it spillover violence, you’re more likely to see a response. If I say to you that someone is raped, it’s going to have more of a political impact than if I say someone was assaulted.”

Just south of the Valley, the Gulf Cartel — which has long dominated smuggling routes through the region — is engaged in a battle for control with its former enforcement wing, the Zetas.

Even as McCraw stood before Peña’s committee Tuesday, armed clashes between cartel operatives and the Mexican military erupted in Reynosa and Rio Bravo, leaving at least three dead and dozens of makeshift roadblocks clogging traffic across the region.

“The Colombian national police were able to effect with the U.S. government effort a plan that did bring down the kingpins,” McCraw said, referring to efforts in the ‘80s that netted top cocaine traffickers like Pablo Escobar. “That hasn’t worked in Mexico. The beheadings, terrorist tactics — we didn’t see that in Colombia.”

During Tuesday’s hearing, Peña asked McCraw to develop specific recommendations to respond to the threat, so the lawmaker can take them to his colleagues when the Legislature reconvenes next year.

His committee is next set to hear testimony on border violence at a May hearing in McAllen.

“Things have changed drastically,” Peña said. “Mexicans who can afford to have moved to our community, businesses are concerned about investing there, and it threatens government institutions in Mexico. That’s a drastic change from what I remember Mexico to be.”

10 comments:

  1. Gerardo "a common citizen"April 4, 2010 at 12:48 PM

    The situation on the Texas side of the border is serious. In Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon and Chihuahua it is critical. But for DPS Director Steve McCraw to state that drug violence in northern Mexico is worse than what occurred in Colombia in the 80's and that terrorist tactics did not occur in Colombia is a blatant lie whose agenda is to ensure the re-election of our "Illustrious" Gov. Rick Perry. These are the same old tactics used by Perry's mentor "Dubya" Bush to frighten and intimidate the unthinking populace into voting correctly before elections. Steve, have you ever heard of the "Colombian" necktie? Can you explain how the following tragedies were not terrorism: car and truck bombings that have killed hundreds in Bogota and throughout Colombia since the 80's? the bombing of the Avianca Airlines plane over Colombia that killed 110 passengers and crew including 2 Americans and for which the U.S. Justice Dept. charged Pablo Escobar? illegal paramilitary groups(AUC) and guerrilla armies(FARC), both financed largely through cocaine trafficking, that have murdered, kidnapped and disappeared tens of thousands since the 80's? The most current data on overall homicide rates show Colombia at 114.5 homicides per 100,000 citizens and Mexico at 17.8 homicides per 100,000 citizens. So, Steve McCraw, either you are a shameless manipulator or the most inept director in the history of the DPS. As any resident or law enforcement agency from Brownsville to Laredo can tell you, drug related crime including assaults and homicides aka "spillover" has always been present. In fact, to use Webb county as an example, spillover violence was just as bad if not worse during the Fred Gomez Carrasco era in the 70's and the Gonzalez Bath era in the 90's.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Gerardo "a common citizen"April 7, 2010 at 4:23 PM

    I forgot to mention. Where was "homeland security" when the Reyes Pruneda clan owned the Nvo Laredo plaza and the "spillover" shed blood from Laredo all the way to San Antonio. Probably hundreds died on this side back then but no one cared. I'm old and only visit los dos Laredos on occasion now but I can say in all honesty that Nvo Laredo was the Cd Juarez of Mexico back in the 70's. There was no military presence like today and the PJF was just another mafia. I witnessed Jaime Gonzalez Bath empty a cuerno de chivo into a car back in 1991 and kill the person who ran the Nvo Laredo plaza "el Tutu" ,his girfriend and a priest! Oh, did I forget to mention, this occured in rush hour 1 block from the local FBI headquarters. It's just hypocritical that people like Steve McCraw suddenly feel the urgency to draw a line in the sand now in 2010. No disrespect Mr McCraw but since I've been alive the number of fatalities from 9-11 multiplied several times over have died from Brownsville/Matamoros to El Paso/Juarez but you only appear to care now because of your cynical political games.

    ReplyDelete
  3. All you guys have to do is think back... There's always been murders.. But before.. I'm going to sound like another broken record around here.. But it's true.. Before we had morale values.. We had "Seniority".. Now a days, a fucking 20 year old will kill a Narco who's been in the game for 30 years, just to take his place and gain "REP".. That's something that for years kept us apart from the common American gangs.. They had respect.. They had morale value.. I send some pictures into borderland which in reality they where random pictures with no explanation.. Just a display of what they do.. In one of the pictures there is a pregnant female.. Looks to be late 20s.. And a young baby girl.. About 4 years.. Could not have been older than 4, with all her teeth broken.. The motherfucking scumbags still had the heart to beat the little girl up, and then proceeded to slit her throat.. Atleast have the decency to shoot her.. Why cut her throat? This guys have crossed the line too far.. There's no going back, the only sad part, and what makes me feel hopeless is that we're not really going to get rid of tyranny.. They're just changing dictators... And it's sad.. It's sad.. Honestly, one only wishes that there was more you could do to help the people.. If only it was possible that real men with balls and heart could step up and make a difference.. But how can one angel go against 10 demons.. It's damn near impossible.. You think that all of the people currently in power wanted to grow up to be a politician, take bribes and get rich? Noo.. Alot of those guys where once little boys who dreamed of making a difference and fighting crime.. Somewhere along the way.. So much bullshit you step on each day, your foot will eventually smell like crap... I guess some people just weren't born into that place.. I wish I could help.. But my destiny doesn't seem to take me in that path.. I remember seeing it on the news, and mentioning it here in an example.. I think he was a chief of police? He had a good heart, he wanted to rid the streets of corruption and clean the rat holes.. Same day he went into office he was shot on his truck, I think it was leaving the ceremony or something.. But single person cannot make a difference, we as people have to stand up.. If Mexico really wants to take back the majority of the country.. And I say the majority because the corruption and drugs will never end.. Please.. I outgrew that when I hit 18.. You will never ever get rid of that.. If the Cartels wouldn’t do it, the Mexican government would.. Or don’t doubt that the US wouldn’t send a couple of thousand PMCs into Mexico, just like they have with Iraq… We will never be completely in control.. But we can be feared.. The citizens should not fear their government, the government should fear its citizens.. Can you imagine the power Mexico can have?.. The potential? Mexico is broke because of corrupt politicians.. Mexico exports oil, if Pemex was public, and not privately owned.. What would happen? It’s not in the politicians best interest to share Pemex because they’d have to open the books to the whole world.. Imagine if Mexico would be able to process its oil.. Can you picture the endless possibilities? Mexico has a lot more resources than the United States, and there is no reason why people in Mexico should suffer.. For what? For the next mans greed? Fuck that..

    Anyways, I’ve gotten way out of topic.. Sorry guys, but yeah Geronimo, I completely agree with you…

    -Maka…

    ReplyDelete
  4. No disrespect? Are you kidding me? Fuck him.. Fuck him and all those idiots who laugh in their cabinets thinking they are smarter than the regular citizen.. The US and Mexico are in a way the same.. Only difference is that in the US we try to turn the other cheek.. We like to "pretend" like we have some sort of leverage or "checks and balances".. Well we don't.. What happened with that fucking low life trash, Pat Ahumada.. He deposited 26,000 dollars into his personal accounts, he got caught and the same day they caught him, the funds where withdrawn from his account and deposited into the citys account. He's the mayor of Brownsville for fuck sakes, he pulls a stunt like that and the jury finds him innocent? It is so unbelivable.. I just can't stand it.. I pull my hairs and prey to god that there still is some sort of morale cap in this world...

    I grew up around the Cartel, I grew up watching how they would stuff the weed into the Jalapeño cans, those huge industrial cans, and how they would seal it back up with this machine, then ship it to Florida.. I've seen murders.. I've been shot at, seen shoot outs.. Seen "Diciplinas"..
    It's just the way I grew up.. And you know, alot of times i've wondered to myself.. Is this normal? How normal would this seem to a person sitting there in Oklahoma.. Or New Jersey.. Or New York.. People think they got it hard in New York? Bloods and Cribs? Hahahahaha.. There's no comparison.. People here will shoot you and still stop and eat in a restaurant two blocks from where they shot you and no one will do a damn thing... There's no sort of balance.. The scale is completely to their advantage.. Truthfully they got the point where they weigh 2 to 3 times more than the government itself.. Think about it.. That's some scary shit.. Even for people in the border, just like Gerardo said.. I had already typed some history from my family here but I decided not to because I in no way want to be linked to any of this shit.. But people have been murdered in Brownsville since I can remember, and a lot of them where drug related.. A lot of times they go missing.. It's funny.. Want to know how fucked up this place is? I knew a guy who when we were younger, he killed a guy for owing him 5,000 dollars.. I'm talking about back in 98-99.. It came out in the news and everything, well guess what he does now? He's a cop.. In Brownsville.. Brownsville-South Padre Island.. Isn't that incredible? That guy would snort a weeks earnings in two days too.. Bet he's giving that evidence room a hard time, ehh!..

    ReplyDelete
  5. Gerardo " a common citizen"April 7, 2010 at 8:20 PM

    You are not off topic cuahte, it is all connected. Welcome to the real world, people, where justice is a sad game. Especially on our side of the river, where we pretend so well. And please respect what is being said by those who bear witness to this insanity. All this dying and misery just so you can smoke a joint or do a line after a bad day at work.

    Un abrazo fuerte R.M., y ten cuidado.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Gerardo I just want 2 know, were u a real witness in Jaime's trial or 1 of those that got a higher position, or $$$$$ from Joe Rubio, Raul Salinas, and Judge Manuel Flores just 2 put Jaime in jail and cover their own crimes?
    CGB

    ReplyDelete
  7. Gerardo que facil es hablar y mover la m---dra de alguien que ya esta en la carcel y no se puede defender, si estan hablando de la violencia actual pues habla de los zetas o de miguel trevino o de sinaloa cartel.
    CGB

    ReplyDelete
  8. Como dices que fuistes testigo? nunca hubo un padre entre los muertos. los testigos que se presentaron en el juicio identificaron al asesino como una hombre robusto y moreno, todo lo contrario de Jaime. nunca hubo un padre entre las victimas y ademas Jaime nunca estuvo en el area del crimen, se encontraba vacacionando con su familia. y que casualidad q toda esa evidencia a favor de Jaime se "perdio". No se como dices que fuistes testigo? A lo menos conoces a Jaime en persona? No creo, no estuvieras hablando cosas que no sabes. CGB

    ReplyDelete
  9. JAIME G. BATH ES UN ASESINO, NO FUE SU PRIMER CRIMEN. PUDRETE EN LA CARCEL ASESINO. Y SI LO DEFIENDES, ERES IGUAL DE CULPABLE.

    ReplyDelete
  10. estuvistes con el en todo momento pa q stes tan seguro(a) si no hincate y chupamela toda deja de mover tu mamadora y si fue asi pues deverias estar con el y me la sigues chupando
    yomero

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com